How the Traditional Japanese Art of Fish Printing Inspired a Modern Art Form

Naoki Hayashi’s first encounter with gyotaku—the traditional Japanese art of fish printing—was anything but traditional. It was the early 1970s, and a few local families had taken their four-wheel drive vehicles out to some Oʻahu beaches to camp out and catch some fish. As an elementary-school kid, Hayashi’s job was to scale and gut the fish so there would be no mess at home. The adults were nearing the end of a successful day of fishing, meaning they were deep into a bucket of beer, sake, and soju. As Hayashi dug around inside a Hawaiian soldierfish for its red-frilled guts, an older family friend grabbed the fish from him, dipped it into rusty bucket full of red paint (a hand-me-down from the Korean War) and slapped the fish against Hayashi’s bare chest. “This is gyotaku,” the older man said, pointing to the distinct red imprint. The son of immigrants who came from a small Japanese fishing village, Hayashi made his first fish print at 11 and, aside from a brief stint studying biochemistry in college, never stopped. Hayashi has since developed a full-time career as a gyotaku artist. First used as a handy way to document the size and shape of a fish, gyotaku has since evolved in...

World’s First 360-degree Rooftop Infinity Pool to be Built in London

Those who suffer from a fear of heights may want to skip this story altogether. Or consider yourself warned. London is set to be the location for the world’s first 360-degree rooftop infinity pool perched atop a 55-story skyscraper. Yep, 55 stories high and just a mere sheet of cast acrylic separating you from the world below. When plans for the pool were announced last week, it practically broke the internet with excitement and confusion, according to the pool’s designer, Alex Kemsley, of Compass Pools. Apparently, people around the world wanted to know how exactly swimmers would get in and out of the pool, INSIDER reported. The pool sits 200 meters high in the sky is made from cast acrylic, a material that transmits light at a similar wavelength to water. The floor of the pool will also be clear, allowing swimmers to see and be seen by visitors below. Yes, it’s all visually jaw-dropping. However, careful observers will note that there’s nothing but water and sky in the renderings. There’s no deck bordering the water on any of its sides. The pool essentially serves as the top of the skyscraper. INSIDER asked Kemsley to explain just how swimmers would be able to get in and out ...