Lightest eBike Kit gives electric superpowers to your bike

E-bikes are not a cheap pleasure; their costs are usually well over $1000. But if you still have a two-wheeler that is in good shape, and also are looking forward to electric power, then the Lightest system on Indiegogo will be the perfect choice for you. An Italian startup Bikee Bike launches its “Lightest eBike Kit” that turns any normal bicycle into an e-bike. The latest product from the Bikee Bike should convince with its low weight, which is between 1.6 and 1.7 kg (without battery) depending on the version. The drive is installed in the bottom bracket area and then acts on the existing chain. The Lightest eBike Kit is available in four different variants. At 1.6 kg, the smallest version with 250 watts is particularly light. It has a nominal voltage of 36 volts, transmits 70 Nm to the driveshaft, and supports electrically up to 25 km/h (16 mph) speed. This version with battery weighs just under 4 kg, including mounting materials. The bike becomes an S-Pedelec in one of the three more powerful variants. These have an output of 500, 750, and 1000 watts, which provides support in turn to speeds of 35, 42, and 50 km/h (22, 26, or 31 mph), respectively. They work with a nominal ...

Skirting U.S. sanctions, Cubans flock to cryptocurrency to shop online, send funds

HAVANA (Reuters) – Jason Sanchez, 35, was able to start buying spare parts online last year for his cellphone repair shop in Havana thanks to the advent of cryptocurrency trading in Communist-run Cuba. Cuba, which in many ways remains stuck in the analogue past, may seem an unlikely hotbed for cryptocurrencies – digital tokens that use encryption techniques to secure transactions. Yet the roll-out of mobile internet nearly a year ago has opened the way for cryptocurrency transactions, and enthusiasts have multiplied as the currency helps overcome obstacles created by U.S. sanctions on Cuba. The decades-old U.S. trade embargo cuts Cubans off from conventional international payment systems and financial markets. Cubans cannot obtain credit or debit cards for international use on the island and struggle to do so abroad. So Cubans like Sanchez are buying digital currencies, which are mostly unregulated, decentralized and anonymous, to make purchases online as well as to invest and trade. “This is really opening new doors for us,” said Sanchez, who uses Bitcoin, the most well known cryptocurrency, to purchase parts not available new in Cuba from an online Chinese store. ...